Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


older | 1 | .... | 245 | 246 | (Page 247) | 248 | 249 | .... | 332 | newer

    0 0

    English
    Order: 
    0
    Author(s): 

    0 0

    New York City Ballet Celebrates George Balanchine

    On January 25, the New York City Ballet will celebrate the birthday of founder George Balanchine, an artist whose influence, in the words of Robert Gottlieb, “has become more pervasive than ever,” with a program of events and performances that highlight his gargantuan and widespread achievements. “Saturday at the Ballet with George,” as the program is called, will feature workshops, demonstrations, discussions, and two performances featuring work Balanchine created for the company.

    Born in Saint Petersburg in 1904, Balanchine made his stage debut in a Maryinsky Theatre Ballet Company production of “The Sleeping Beauty” at the age of 10. After joining the corps de ballet at age 17, he had a brief but storied career on the Russian stage before coming to America in 1933 at the insistence of Lincoln Kirstein. Together, they formed the School of American Ballet. In 1948, they were welcomed into the family at the City Center (New York City Drama Company and the New York City Opera) and were christened the New York City Ballet. Balanchine served as the artistic director of the company until his death, in 1983. In many ways, Balanchine is the New York City Opera.

    In a program designed to interest people of all ages, audiences can see for themselves. The matinee performance features “Concerto Baracco,” Balanchine’s work set to Bach’s “Concerto in D minor for Two Violins,” which premiered in 1941. Edwin Denby, the preeminent dance critic, called it “the masterpiece of a master choreographer,” and it will be joined in the program by “Kammermusik No. 2,” along with the George Gershwin-scored “Who Cares?” The evening performance will feature “Jewels,” which, according to the company’s description, is “the world’s first-ever plotless full-length ballet.” The ballet first premiered in 1967, and Arlene Croce, former dance critic for The New Yorker, rapturously claimed “it is still unsurpassed as a Balanchine primer, incorporating in a single evening every important article of faith to which this choreographer subscribed and a burst of heresy, too, to remind us that he willingly reversed himself on occasion.” Taken together, the two programs offer an essential overview of Balanchine’s work.

    George Balanchine would have been 110 this year. Beyond his work on the stage, his greatest contribution might be advancing his lifelong passion that the ballet belong to all people, and should be seen by all. “The people who really appreciate ballet come and just look at it and if they don’t understand, come back again,” Balanchine once wrote. “Just come in and stare.”

    Information about “Saturday at the Ballet with George” can be found at the New York City Ballet website

    New York City Ballet performing George Balanchine’s "Emeralds"

    0 0

    Last Chance: Lee Ufan at Kamel Mennour in Paris

    Kamel Mennour, Paris
    Open November 6, 2013 through January 25, 2014

    Lee’s first show at the gallery occupies both of
 its spaces. The Rue-Saint-André-des-Arts location
 shows seven canvases from the “Dialogues” series,
 2008–13. Though large in scale, the majority of the
 canvases are left blank. Each features an iteration
 of the slightly contoured square that has appeared in Lee’s work since his “Correspondence” paintings, begun in 1991. Most of these shapes are gray fading to white in subtle strokes, in some cases to the point of invisibility. Lee mixes oil with natural mineral pigments, intensifying the elements’ color and expanding their range: far from uniform, the grays contain a subtle richness of blues, greens, and yellows. In the most densely worked passages at the widest edges of the shapes, the paint forms a thick crust where the layers of mineral shimmer: a continental shelf in miniature.

    The monumental simplicity of these works reflects Lee’s sensitive reticence and his concept of the “art of encounter.” This encounter plays out in the negotiation between formal control and the unpredictable nature of the minerals, and is dramatized by the artist’s emphasis on gesture and its self-extinction.

    For the more ambitious installation at the Rue du Pont de Lodi, La peinture ensevelie, 2013, the artist covers two canvases on 
the floor with squares of irregularly raked sand, so that only the painted shapes are seen. The works sit on a surface of pale gravel interrupted by three large granite rocks. Evoking the Zen garden, the work approaches pseudo-spiritual kitsch more than the artist’s earlier large-scale sculptural assemblages. Lee has previously discussed the shameful connotation attached to the artist’s vocation from his Korean education, a position that “burying” painting under sand comes perilously close to replicating. Taken together, the “Dialogues,” despite their beauty, begin to look like paintings that would rather be craft, discipline, philosophy, religion—anything but art itself. Matthew McLean

    Lee Ufan, "La peinture ensevelie," 2013 (installation view)

    0 0
  • 01/24/14--10:31: New York, 20th Street
  • Undefined
    Location Email: 
    Brief info: 

     

    Kim Foster Gallery promotes a select group of contemporary artists that have been with the gallery for over a decade. The gallery is focused on enabling these artists to explore and evolve in significantly different ways, but with remarkable coherence within the gallery’s affinity towards unconventional work. These artists deviate from traditional mediums and instead have developed entirely new methods and sophisticated techniques that often require massive hand labor and the assistance of specialists. For example, Jim Toia’s newest project involves creating sculptures of abandoned leaf cutter ant colonies that he cast with the assistance of entomologists and engineers from the University of Texas. Diane Samuels’s recent commission, a hand engraved glass pedestrian bridge for Brown University, required her inventing a patent-pending method for constructing glass windows.

    The gallery has established long lasting relationships with its artists, encouraging exploration of their unique style.

    Kim Foster, Owner/Director Kim Foster Gallery 529 West 20th Street New York, NY 10011 Tel/Fax: (212) 229-0044 Email:info@kimfostergallery.com

     

    Display: 
    Don't display
    Use alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): 
    Address: 
    Javascript is required to view this map.
    Neighborhood: 
    Monday - Close: 
    12:00am
    Tuesday - Open: 
    11:00am
    Tuesday - Close: 
    06:00pm
    Wednesday - Open: 
    11:00am
    Wednesday - Close: 
    06:00pm
    Thursday - Open: 
    11:00am
    Thursday - Close: 
    06:00pm
    Friday - Open: 
    11:00am
    Friday - Close: 
    06:00pm
    Location Phone: 
    t/f +1 212 229 0044
    Saturday - Open: 
    11:00am
    Saturday - Close: 
    06:00pm
    Sunday - Open: 
    12:00am
    Sunday - Close: 
    12:00am
    Monday - Open: 
    12:00am
    Has Cafe: 
    Has Store: 
    Has Film: 
    Is Free Listing: 
    Opening Hours Alternative Text: 
    Tuesday through Saturday 11am to 6pm
    location fax: 
    Guide Landing page: 
    Region on the Guide Landing page: 
    None

    0 0

    Amour Fou: Director Alain Guiraudie On “Stranger by the Lake”

    Alain Guiraudie’s “Stranger by the Lake,” which opens in New York on January 24, has a deceptively simple premise. Frank (Pierre Deladonchamps), an affable young man, returns each day to a secluded lake that doubles as a cruising spot. There, he chats with friends, including the quiet Henri (Patrick d’Assumçao), swims in the glowing blue water, and finds companionship in the woods that surround the beach. One day he meets Michel (Christophe Paou), a seductive but mysterious individual. The two become tangled in a murder that happens on the lake as their desire spirals out of control.

    In a conversation with ARTINFO, Guiraudie, joined by a translator, discussed the narrative benefits of shooting at a lake, nature as a character, and how the explicit sex in the film didn’t go far enough.

    How did you land upon setting the film at the lake?

    The origin of the film, the idea of the lake, was something very simple for me. It’s the kind of lake I’m familiar with, it’s the kind of place I went to. It’s a place where everyone has their place, but it’s also a very democratic kind of place. You see all kinds of people and everyone comes there. I was also interested in doing a film out in the open air, with lots of sunshine.

    The lake you chose for the film is very specific in its shape, which resembles a horn. It gives the setting a claustrophobic atmosphere, even though it’s out in the open.

    I wanted a lake in the sunniest region of France, and the water at this lake is really beautiful. The beach that’s in the film wasn’t the first choice, actually — the first choice was a little different. But this beach, we called it banana-shaped, lends itself very well to the story we were telling. You have the place where Henri sits, which enables him to look from his vantage point to see the beach. From the beach where all the naked men are, they are in a position where they can always see where Henri is. So the configuration of the shoreline worked very well. Also, I think with this particular lake, it was important we also considered the ultimate tragedy, the Greek tragedy of the film, and shape of the lake has some of those elements too.

    Do you see the lake as a character?

    It’s interesting that you ask that question. I like that it comes up, but it’s not something that I intellectualize. To me, characters are men and women — they’re human beings. But, you know, it pleases me that people notice this, because I worked very hard on the images in the film.

    With its use of repetition and a circular structure, were you attempting the narrative to mirror the lake, which as you said has tragic elements to it?

    I think more than a circular structure for me it was a triangular structure. You have the triangle of the three characters — Michel, Frank, and Henri — and things circulate from one or the other. But Frank is the focal point, so you see the motion that way. And the motion, instead of a circle, was more like a spiral — a spiral of desire that was created in the film. It wasn’t something that I did deliberately. As far as what happens on the lake, what I wanted to do was to start with this area of the lake — it’s wide open, it’s sunny, it’s beautiful — and then gradually, as the film continues, things become more and more closed in as it moves to the forest. Perhaps it was a combination of that, the setting they were working in, but what was circulating between, not just these three men, but all of the men, that I wasn’t aware of while we were shooting but became evident while we were editing the film. It was during the editing that this idea of the spiral of desire really popped out for me.

    The film features no music, but the sound design is consciously focused on the shoreline, the water, the wind in the trees.

    We were shooting without any added sound and we wanted to go with as natural a sound as possible. This was a major choice I made. As a result, when we were doing the final edit of the film there was very little cleanup we had to do because we were sticking with the sounds as they had occurred during the shooting. We were able not to pile on additional layers of sound, so in the end it was very pure. We did add some sound at the end, but they were based on the sounds recorded while filming. They were put together as a sort of symphony of the natural sounds.

    Were you aware the sex was going to be such a main focal point in the reception in the film? [When the film was released in France in June, the poster was removed from certain suburbs due to its perceived graphic nature.]

    I actually planned to include a lot more explicit sex in the film. In the end, I decided not to show penetration without a contraceptive, for ethical reasons. We used doubles in the scenes, and it would have been difficult to ask doubles, who don’t know each other, to have unprotected sex. I used, of course, professional doubles, but I could have easily called upon a couple in real life. I just didn’t go to the limit with that. I think I’m going to go a little further in the future. With this whole question of sex, I’m going really slowly and really carefully, because in this film there are only really two explicit sex scenes. I think also my desire in making this film was not to shock the bourgeoisie, but it was really to show a film where there’s this fluid process between the actual sex and the passion that is being expressed, and I think to achieve that end is why I ultimately chose to include less explicit sex. Do you think the sex scenes have caused a polemic?

    I wouldn’t say polemic, but they are at the front of the conversation, for sure.

    In that sense, yeah. I agree [laughs]. I was talking to the film distributor in Germany, where the film didn’t do well. They felt the film didn’t do well there was because the critics had put too much emphasis on just talking about the sex. There are more scenes with people talking on the beach than sex scenes [laughs].

    Pierre Deladonchamps in a scene from "Stranger by the Lake."

    0 0

    English
    Order: 
    0
    Author(s): 

    0 0

    The beau monde of Brussels — Antwerp fashion-clad design types mingling with subtly attired, tastefully bejeweled patrons — welcomed the 11th edition of BRAFA, the Brussels fair of antiques, fine art, and design, to the Tour et Taxis event venue, a former customs depot built by the Thurn und Taxis family between 1902 and 1907, in private events on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday. The fair opens to the public on Saturday and runs through February 2. Originally a forum for primarily Belgian dealers, BRAFA has expanded its international reach, drawing roughly 60 percent of participants from Canada and countries throughout Europe, leaving the 40 percent balance to the home team. Efforts in recent years to bolster the fair’s quality, positioning it as a precursor to TEFAF, have been solid — though price points offer accessibility to young collectors as well as those merely looking to acquire a pretty object with a notable provenance.

    “We’ve been attending for a while,” said Louis Castor of ParisGalerie Willy Huybrechts, which is participating in the fair for the first time this year. “The collectors are very interesting.” Castor said attendees impress with a deep knowledge of various collecting categories. “They understand what’s here.” A rock crystal lamp, for example, looking very much like two by Jean-Michel Frank that sold at Christie’s in December for prices around $300,000, was actually by Frank’s less well known contemporary Syrie Maugham, the designer spouse of playwright W. Somerset Maugham. Clever collectors could snag Maugham’s version or a pair of andirons capped with chunks of black quartz for a relatively low €30,000 ($41,000).

     

    Collectors were also on the mind of Craig Finch of London’s Finch & Co., which mounted a booth of curiosities, including a Central Ivory Coast early 20th-century Baule/Yaure mask for €125,000 ($171,000), an ancient sandstone Celtic head for €33,000 ($45,000), and a late 19th-century piglet in a jar for €4,750 ($6,500). “We love the collectors here. We don’t see them in New York or London.”


    Giò Ponti's "Sette Colori" vase (circa 1948) at Marc Heiremans

    Brussels stalwart decorative arts gallery Marc Heiremans offers a spectacular examination of 20th-century Italian glass, with prime examples by Scarpa and a museum quality collection of Seguso factory designs. “It’s a risk to show exclusively glass,” said Heiremans. But scouts from other fairs, such as TEFAF and Design Basel, are around to take note of exceptional presentations. At Heiremans’s BRAFA booth, pieces in a broad price range between €1,000 and €50,000 ($1,400-$68,000) were moving briskly, making the risk well worthwhile.

    Click on the slideshow to see images from BRAFA 2014.

    BRAFA Brings Savvy Collectors to Brussels
    BRAFA Fair entrance

    0 0

    Performing Arts Week in Review: Renee Fleming, NYC Ballet, and More

    — Renee Fleming returns to the Metropolitan Opera in “Rusalka.”

    — Larry Blumenfeld reports from New Orleans, where musicians are trying to bury the noise ordinance.

    — Patrick Pacheco takes a look at the Broadway League’s recent demographics report.

    — Craig Hubert sits down with French director Alain Guiraudie to talk about his new film, “Stranger by the Lake,” which opens at Lincoln Center on January 24.

    — The New York City Ballet celebrates the birthday of its co-founder, George Balanchine.

    — Patrick Pacheco talks to actor Samuel Barnett, currently starring in Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night.”

    Bradley Cooper will hit the Broadway stage in “The Elephant Man” this fall.

    — Our Performing Arts Pick of the Week comes via Deutsche Grammophon: Rolando Villazon’s “Mozart: Concert Arias”

    — We’re excited about the news that the New York Philharmonic will stage “Joan of Arc at the Stake” with actress Marion Cotillard.

    Renée Fleming performing the title role in Dvořák's "Rusalka."

    0 0

    English
    Order: 
    0
    Popular Cities: 
    Author(s): 

    0 0
  • 01/24/14--13:57: Boston
  • Undefined
    Location Email: 
    Display: 
    Don't display
    Use alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): 
    Address: 
    Javascript is required to view this map.
    Neighborhood: 
    Monday - Close: 
    12:00am
    Tuesday - Open: 
    10:00am
    Tuesday - Close: 
    05:30pm
    Wednesday - Open: 
    10:00am
    Wednesday - Close: 
    05:30pm
    Thursday - Open: 
    10:00am
    Thursday - Close: 
    05:30pm
    Friday - Open: 
    10:00am
    Friday - Close: 
    05:30pm
    Location Phone: 
    t: +1 617 262 4490
    Saturday - Open: 
    10:00am
    Saturday - Close: 
    05:30pm
    Sunday - Open: 
    12:00am
    Sunday - Close: 
    12:00am
    Monday - Open: 
    12:00am
    Has Cafe: 
    Has Store: 
    Has Film: 
    Is Free Listing: 
    Opening Hours Alternative Text: 
    Tuesday to Saturday: 10am - 5:30pm
    location fax: 
    Guide Landing page: 
    Region on the Guide Landing page: 
    None

    0 0

    VIDEO: Eye on the Catwalk — Valentino’s Tribute to the Opera

    Opening with a sheer white tulle gown embroidered with a section of the musical score from “La Traviata,” Valentino for the set of its hauntingly beautiful opera-themed Spring-Summer 2014 haute couture collection called on Maurizio Varamo from the Teatro dell’Opera di Roma opera house in Rome, with the rich garments adding to the décor.

    Moving between different weights of cloth — from wispy laces to cashmere to a wild cape of black feathers —  a jungle story evoked the works of Giuseppe Verdi, Henry Purcell and Amilcare Ponchielli, with intarsia motifs of wild beasts on tailored wool coats and capes recalling the naïve, or primitive, jungle scenes of French artist Henri Rousseau. The spirit of Aida was conjured in a black and gold dress with jute fringing and a roaring lion across its front, and Elektra, by a starkly monastic slate gray dress.

    Despite the serene beauty of the clothes, a melancholic, heart of darkness stirred. A dying white swan and a snake wrapped around dresses with distressed tutus, one an intense rust shade, inspired by Richard Wagner’s “Lohengrin.” And, embroidered on a gray tulle gown, a scene inspired by the works of Lucas Cranach depicted Adam passing an apple to Eve.

    Told across 55 looks, the show managed not to look costumey despite its epic proportions, instead proffering one-of-a-kind works of art that could look just as good on a museum wall. Valentino remains one of the few houses whose poetic resonance and formidable level of craftsmanship, under the helm of design duo Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli, keeps the flame burning for the good old days of couture.

    Valentino in Rome

    0 0

    Body: 

    ARTINFO's team of international editors pick the most photographic neighborhoods across some of the world's most vibrant cities

    English
    Order: 
    0
    Robert Michael Poole
    Top Story Home: 
    Top Story - Channel: 
    Exclude from Landing: 
    Global Region: 
    Feature Image: 
    Photographic Neighborhoods: : A Global Guide
    Thumbnail Image: 
    Photographic Neighborhoods: : A Global Guide
    Credit: 
    Courtesy of Flickr/Dynom
    Region: 
    Slide: 
    Title: 
    Beijing: Shichahai
    Image: 
    Beijing: Shichahai
    Body: 

    A narrow chain of lakes once part of the Imperial Garden complex, Shichahai is composed of Xihai, Houhai, and Qianhai. It’s here that innumerable summers have been whiled away since the Qing Dynasty. During the sweltering months of July and August tourists arrive in flocks at the cool shores of the lakes, but the neighborhood has more to offer photographers than views of still water. Hop in a rickshaw or rent a bicycle to tour the surrounding hutongs, old houses yet to meet the wrecking balls that have flattened much of old Beijing, to capture timeless images. Tandem bicycles are especially popular with couples wanting to take in the well-preserved temples and palaces that sit peacefully by the lake, lending an air of romance to many a picture.

    Come winter the tide of tourists recedes and locals instead come out to enjoy the scenery, when icicles hang around the railings and a hefty sheet of ice forms on the surface of the lake. Dogs chase dried leaves in circles while elderly people set up their stools and cut holes in the lake to go fishing. Opportunities for shots of daily life are in abundance as children play in small sleds while the more accomplished ice skaters glide around them. And if it gets too cold on the hands, warm them up while holding a mug at one of the many nearby teahouses – or capture the future at Great Leap Brewing, Beijing’s first local craft beer experience. — Belle Zhao

    Cover image courtesy of Flickr/Dynom

     

     

    Credit: 
    Courtesy Flickr/ X'mas
    Title: 
    Berlin: Museum Island
    Image: 
    Berlin Museumsinsel
    Body: 

    Berlin’s Museumsinsel (Museum Island) is central, iconic and serene. German chancellor Angela Merkel still lives here, in an inconspicuous orange building, surrounded by some of the city’s most famous cultural institutions and architectures: the Bode Museum, the Pergamon Museum, the Alte Nationalgalerie, and the Neues Museum (home to the bust of Nefertiti) that was recently renovated under the helm of British star architect David Chipperfield. Perhaps of most interest for photographers aiming to capture the scene of imposing grandeur, will be the Museum of Photography itself.

    The Humboldt University– Berlin’s first ­– with its classicist façade, the I. M. Pei designed German Historical Museum, the Berlin Cathedral and the Maxim Gorki Theater are a stone’s throw away. Walk a little further and you’re on bustling Friedrichstraße or in the popular (and also very photogenic) Hackesche Höfe neighborhood, if you’ve any film left. Don’t be surprised if you spot beaten up facades among the mostly renovated architecture here; Museumsinsel channels Berlin’s history like perhaps no other spot in town, and original bullet holes from WWII still dot some of the walls.

    Oh, and if you’d like an Instagram pic of Merkel’s spectacularly unspectacular front door: look out for the stationed policemen. If you’re lucky, they’ll even pose for you. – Lisa Contag

    Credit: 
    Courtesy Flickr/VisitBerlin
    Title: 
    Delhi: Nizamuddin
    Image: 
    Delhi: Nizamuddin
    Body: 

    Sprawling Nizamuddin in the center of Delhi has an advantage over other historic areas in the city. Dating back to the 13th century, the area – one of Delhi’s oldest surviving postcodes – is now divided into East and West, with photo ops scattered throughout. Start in the East with the UNESCO-listed Humayun’s Tomb, one of Delhi’s most famous Mughal artifacts. Renovations recently finished here, so the domes are at their best, as are the adjoining gardens. Keep the early morning hours for these photos, and hop across to the famous Damdama Sahib gurudwara next door for pictures of its pristine high white temple walls and Sikhs “in service” (part of the faith is giving back to society) milling around. Time it correctly, and you could also be there for the daily langar prasad food handout, renowned as the best in the city.

    Once you’re done with the East, cross the crazy main road carefully into the winding alley of Nizamuddin basti, or tightly-packed community. This is the best place for biryani and kebabs (try our personal favorites: Nasir Iqbal for biryani, and Ghalib’s Kebab Corner for beef tikkas), but also for people photographs, as the crowd moves around you. As well as the odd goat.

    Move down the lane for the Nizamuddin dargah or Sufi shrine, where on Thursday evenings you can listen to Sufi singers who perform here for free, and capture great twilight-into-nighttime shots. Finally, for a look at middle-class Delhi in the 50s and 60s, walk around the neighborhood to shoot the remaining old squat buildings, built up in the bungalow style popular then, but vanishing into new construction now. – Meenakshi Reddy Madhavan

    Nearest metro: Jangpura

    Credit: 
    Nick Irvine/ Fortescue
    Title: 
    Madrid: Lavapies
    Image: 
    Madrid: Lavapies
    Body: 

    Lavapies neighborhood in Madrid is a goldmine for photographers, being at once one of the most traditional, multicultural and modern locations of the capital. Known to locals as the Embajadores (“Ambassador’s”) district, despite having shifted its name years ago, the old main square gives context to one of the most emblematic areas of the city.

    It’s the transformations throughout history that offer snap-happy travellers the wealth of sights: it was regarded as the Jewry of the city in the 14th century, then in combination with the counterculture Malasaña neighborhood it was subjected to a gradual abandonment – reflected in the ruins of the ancient Escuelas Pias in Agustín Lara square.

    In the late 20th Century, the neighborhood was a receptacle for the illegal houses occupation, and its mixed character drew one of the highest rate of foreigners and immigrants in Madrid. Today, on streets like Calle del Doctor Fourquet and Calle del Argumosa, contemporary art galleries and cosmopolitan characters drink on terraces and create a colorful scene on the streets, awaiting capture by camera-wielding visitors.

    With more than a dozen galleries such as Helga del Alvear, Espacio Mínimo, Nogueras Blanchard, and Maisterravalbuena, plus the forthcoming arrival of the ARCO Madrid Fair, Lavapies is set to cement itself as the hotbed of creativity for years to come. – Marcos Fernandez

    Title: 
    Milan: Porta Nuova
    Image: 
    Milan: Porta Nuova
    Body: 

    Finding a spot where past and future meet perfectly isn’t an easy task in Italian cities – they are one or the other – but the new area of Porta Nuova in Milan is a certain exception, making itself ideal for photography addicts.

    Three old neighborhoods combine in this one district famed for the sandstone Napoleonic gates that gave the area its name. Isola, Varesine, and Garibaldi converge here to create an unusual skyline that mixes traditional low brick buildings from the beginnings of 19th Century with gleaming glass high-rises, part of the “Porta Nuova Project” which began in the late 2000s to renew the decaying area. That means for the next few years, with new structures by architects including Stefano Boeri, Cesar Pelli and Nicholas Grimshaw, unique opportunities for capturing the change from old to new will be only temporary.

    Our top tip for Instagram addicts and pro-photographers alike is a stroll around the old streets of Garibaldi and Isola, behind the construction sites of future skyscraper, from where an attentive eye will be able to catch breathtaking shots of change in motion, far from the tourist traps of central Milan. – Sara Schifano.

    Credit: 
    Courtesy Sergio Giuseppe Lorizio
    Title: 
    Moscow: Winzavod & Artplay
    Image: 
    Moscow: Winzavod & Artplay
    Body: 

    The area of Moscow around the Kurskaya railway station is a true magnet for photographers of every stripe and color. It is here that the two art-clusters – Winzavod and Artplay– are located, drawing daily hordes of visitors who flock to appreciate their creative cultural programming and the eclectic urban scenery. Every second visitor comes equipped with a professional camera, every first one either taking smart-phone pictures of the brick buildings or (even more eagerly) making selfies against the red-brick backdrop.

    Launched in 2007 on the grounds of a former brewery Winzavod is one of Moscow’s first centers for contemporary art that today houses several galleries (XL, Regina, Grinberg, pop/off/art) artists' studios (Aidan Salakhova, Valery Chtak, Oleg Kulik), book stores and cafes. Over time several local fashion designers opened their showrooms here as well, among them Daria Razumikhina and Svetlana Tegin with Tegin Fashion House

    Located just around the corner, the ARTPLAY Design Center has carefully reconstructed the former factory buildings it had come to occupy and converted them into a business and trade center for designers, architects and engineers. Besides the many shops and boutiques, ARTPLAY now hosts a number of young galleries, and in late 2011 it held the Main Project of the IV Moscow Biennale of Contemporary Art, confirming its status as a center of creativity.  

    Our top tip is the famed and oh-so-romantic roof of the Design Center, a hot-spot for summer concerts and parties that is transformed every winter into a popular ice-rink. From the roof photographers can capture the trains from the nearby Kurskaya railway station, which adds to the hip industrial charm of the images taken here. – Anastasia Barysheva

    Title: 
    Seoul: Ihwa-dong
    Image: 
    Seoul: Ihwa-dong
    Body: 

    Located near Daehakro (a.k.a. Daehangno), a college town that has long been the country’s hotspot for theater and dance, Ihwa-dong is one of Seoul’s last remaining daldongnae — so-called slum “moon villages” located on steep mountain slopes, and thus closer to the moon.

    In 2006, however, a public art project invited artists and local residents to give the area a makeover, and as a result more than 60 works have brightened up the neighborhood.

    Ihwa-dong has since emerged as a rite of passage for Instagrammers with a mission to locate all the artwork, which is comprised mostly of colorful murals that decorate crooked walls, steep staircases, and old store facades. Moreover, the meandering alleyways lined with mom-and-pop stores and retro barbershops provide a unique experience for both local and visitor photographers.

    Don’t forget to turn around once in a while to get a panoramic view of Seoul’s cityscape extending from Mt. Namsan in the south to Mt. Bukhan in the north — you can “reach for the moon” after all! — Lee Hyo-won

    How to get there: Take exit 2 of Hyehwa Station on subway line 4. Walk straight, passing by Marronier Park until you reach Ihwa Sageori (Intersection). Turn left and then left again to reach Yulgok-ro 19-gil (street). Walk uphill until you see Mihwa Barbershop, which is decorated in bright red and blue. This leads into the alleyways of Ihwa-dong.

    Credit: 
    Courtesy Flickr/ My_Haru
    Title: 
    Singapore: Katong
    Image: 
    Singapore: Katong
    Body: 

    Katong is one of the oldest neighborhoods on Singapore’s East Coast and it has retained much of its period architectural charm, offering plenty of opportunities to capture Singapore “through the years.”

    The area is closely associated with the Peranakans— the Chinese immigrants who settled in the Straits of Malacca in the 19th century who adopted and adapted the local Malay culture. The Peranakans weren’t shy of displaying their success, and rows of old shophouses still stand with their colorful façades, decorative glazed tiles, and pintu pagar (a decorative entrance).

    Away from the main streets, more Peranakan houses can be found with their welcoming courtyard to the front. Though many have been modernized internally, the exteriors remain unchanged, giving a true impression of times gone by. Fast-forward half a century, and you will also find buildings from the 1930s with their Art Deco feel, and bungalows from the 1950s – though many are disappearing, often replaced by three or four storied ultra-modern homes.

    The neighborhood is fast developing with chi-chi cafés replacing the coffee shops of old, but Katong is still said by locals to offer some of the most authentic Peranakan cuisine and best laksa in Singapore. Watching people go about their daily lives as you sit and sample the variety of food is of course a great way to unwind after taking in the sights. – Sonia Kolesnikov-Jessop

    Credit: 
    Courtesy Flickr/ Marting Kaftan
    Title: 
    Tokyo: Yanaka
    Image: 
    Tokyo: Yanaka
    Body: 

    Japan’s reputation for contrasting ultra-modernity with an old samurai culture is rarely seen in the nation’s capital, which boasts plenty of the former, but due mostly to earthquakes and safety requirements, has left the latter to be maintained in former capital cities and mountain towns.

    There is one area of Tokyo though that offers photographers a different perspective of the megalopolis. Yanaka is a shitamachi (town below a castle) district to the south of Nippori station, centered around a cemetary. Rustic and near-silent, the area feels a world away from central Tokyo thanks to the quiet ambience, and the fact that is survived fire bombing in World War II leaving plenty of the neighborhood intact. 7,000 gravestones tell their own tales of bygone Tokyo, beautifully maintained and often ornate. Capture them in April draped by the pink of blooming cherry blossom trees.

    Yanaka Ginza, the shopping street here, offers a true alternative to the malls of Shibuya where butchers, barbers and candy-makers sit side by side, offering colorful opportunities to cameramen, as well as timeless treats.

    In the last few years Yanaka has attracted the art scene too, with galleries SCAI the Bathhouse and HIGURE 17-15 cas opening their doors. Then last year, Hagiso, the “smallest possible integrated cultural facility” set up with a gallery, café, art studio, hair salon and design office, all in a two-storey structure on a quiet backstreet wood-framed building. Even today, the old alleys of Yanaka seem to turn up unexpected surprises, all of which give photographers a little something different to discover. – Robert Michael Poole

    Credit: 
    Courtesy Flickr/ oafbot
    Cover image: 
    Short title: 
    Photographic Neighborhoods: A Global Guide
    Top Story France: 
    Top Story - Australia: 
    Top Story - Canada: 
    Top Story - HK: 
    Top Story - India: 
    Top Story - UK: 
    Top Story - China: 
    Top Story - Brazil: 
    Top Story - Germany: 
    Top Story Russia: 
    Top Story - Southeast Asia: 
    Top Story - English, Chinese: 
    Top Story - Korea: 
    Top Story - Japan: 
    Top Story - English, Japan: 
    Top Story - English, Korea: 
    Top Story - Italy: 
    Top Story - Austria: 
    Top Story - Mexico: 
    Top Story - Spain: 
    Top Story - Colombia: 

    0 0

    English
    Order: 
    0
    Author(s): 

    0 0

    The 60th anniversary of the Winter Antiques Show is in full swing at the Park Avenue Armory. In honor of the show's Diamond Jubilee, the fair is celebrating with a special exhibition of antique diamonds, including Queen Victoria's tiara from 1842.

    The 73 exhibitors at this year's show have brought the best of the best from their collections. Benoist F. Drut of Maison Gerard brought a Jean Dunand wall paneling from 1928, retailing between $500,000 and one-million dollars. Dunand was one of the most important French lacquers of the Art Deco period. 

    Patrick Bell of Olde Hope Antiques Inc, which specializes in American country antiques, says antique buyers have varied their interests over the years. They no longer just buy one type or style of piece. Bell is selling a Pennsylvania German decorate dower chest for $385,000. 

    All net proceeds from the show's Opening Night Party, Young Collectors Night, and general ticket sales benefit the East Side House Settlement

    The Winter Antiques Show is at the Park Avenue Armory,  Park Avenue at 67th Street, through February 2. 

     

     

    VIDEO: Winter Antiques Show at The Park Avenue Armory
    Winter Antiques Show, Park Avenue Armory, Queen Victoria

    0 0

    Many of the architecture exhibitions mounted today at major cultural institutions offer a secondary experience of the medium. Scale models, blueprints, drawings, photographs ­­— because architectural ephemera is typically used to represent a building in its absence, the visceral experience of an edifice is too often lost on the museum visitor. Such exhibitions train their audiences to consider the discipline, capitalized: Labrouste’s Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris is Architecture, but the local library branch back home is only a functional building.

    The Royal Academy in London aspires to take an altogether different approach to displaying architecture in “Sensing Spaces: Architecture Reimagined,” on view through April 6. In the show, commonly held ideas of what constitutes architecture are challenged, and the typical presentation of architecture in a museum setting is reimagined. Curator Kate Goodwin focused her energies on the ingredient most often missing from architecture shows today: buildings.

    Goodwin hopes to give visitors a taste for buildings designed by Pritzker winners like Álvaro Siza and Eduardo Souto de Moura, and emerging designers like Pezo von Ellrichshausen. Kengo Kuma, Grafton Architects, and Diébédo Francis Kéré also designed structures for the exhibition. Essential to all the work in the show is the idea that the entire built environment — not only buildings and not only those designed by famed architects — should be considered more critically by the average man. By heightening visitors’ awareness to their surroundings inside the museum, “Sensing Spaces” seeks to increase consciousness of the built environment beyond the museum’s walls.

    Though “Sensing Spaces” relies on the talents of many architects, the exhibition is truly Goodwin’s idea and project. She conceptualized the show, selected the featured designers, and organized their individual contributions into a unified effort. She also kept a blog documenting the installation of the show, making much of the process open to public discussion.

    During the rush between the last days of installation and the opening of “Sensing Spaces,” Goodwin took the time to tell ARTINFO about her exhibition and what she hopes visitors will take away from the show. 

    What was the genesis of “Sensing Spaces”? How did you get the idea for the exhibition?

    I’ve always been very interested in how one experiences architecture — there’s something very central about the physicality of being within a space and how our bodies respond to it. And I think that experience is difficult to communicate, so much so that often we talk about architecture through images and exhibitions. But that actual physicality of being within a space is so intriguing in architecture, and there’s something very elemental about it. I wanted to find a way of bringing that to the discussion about how spaces affect you when you are within them. One has an emotional and psychological response to that and it very much influences everyday life. But when we talk about architecture it often means practical, traditional, social trends. Its emotive power is something that is probably less commonly spoken about.

    What do people stand to gain from a heightened awareness of architecture or the way in which space is constructed around them?

    People do have responses to architecture, it’s just not something that is always in the foreground of our minds. We sometimes get more anxious in a particular place, but we can’t always understand the spatial element of it.

    I think architecture can make you more present in time and space, and more aware of what you’re doing. It can be something very simple, like a very humble feeling that’s about comforting, about appreciation. And I think architecture can bring a great deal of joy to our lives. By being more aware of surrounding space, you also work better in that environment. You realize that buildings should be built for people, to make them feel comfortable in a space. That connection to the place you’re in, understanding the landscape — it’s a basic human need.

    How did you select the architects represented in the show?

    I had a long list of architects, but all the designers I eventually selected are very practically and functionally attuned. And yet, they all consciously think about how architecture might connect to the human spirit — be it through Feng-shui, a very strong sense of material, or a very strong sense of what it is to experience a place. They all come from very different places, and their diversity gives you different thoughts and perspectives, sometimes contradictory. I mean, some of these architects talk very much about architecture and objects that then become a spatial experience. And yet, someone like Kengo Kuma actively talks about anti-object. And I think if you contrast this, it opens up how you think about the nature of the architectural experience. I also thought a varied generational background — we’ve got highly acclaimed Pritzker Prize winners and also emerging practices that are used to working on a smaller scale — would open up discussion from different perspectives.

    Were you inspired by any previous architecture exhibitions? Are there precedents for this kind of visceral exhibition? Or is this a reaction to the model-and-blueprint style of displaying architecture in the museum?

    I have enjoyed exhibitions of architecture that use models and representations — they can be intriguing and engage your imagination. But this is a reaction to how we talk about architecture, and I think there’s a lot of value in other modes of discussing the built environment, other than models. You can talk about the sociopolitical aspect of it and so on. Instead, I was trying to think about how you can stimulate the discussion about experience and people around architecture, in a way that kind of empowers people to respond themselves to the space and their surroundings. I don’t know how they all will react, there’s no set route to the galleries — visitors are invited to explore. We’re giving them a plan, a kind of map, but I’m intrigued to find out which direction they really move in. Quite often we have reactions towards light, or towards the biggest structure. And I think it will be different for every visitor.

    So no models and blueprints in this show?

    None. It’s just the structures and a bit of information on iPads. I think we want to find out how people feel around buildings. The iPads have information about technical drawings and such — an optional extra for people who are intrigued by that — but the theme here is really the experience of architecture and what we might gain from understanding that.

    Click on the slideshow to see images from “Sensing Spaces: Architecture Reimagined.”

    "Sensing Spaces": Not Your Average Architecture Show [VIDEO]
    Installation by Kengo Kuma

    0 0

    Botero Escapes Inferno, Neshat Stumps for Artists in Davos, and More

    – Fernando Botero Flees Fire: The Colombian sculptor Fernando Botero, renowned for his bronze sculptures of rotund animals and human figures, managed to get out of his holiday home safely after a fire broke out, though the estate’s caretaker was not so lucky — he was injured in the blaze by a falling beam. “We received a call at 11:45 p.m. Three engines attended the fire. The painter and his friends are fine,” said fire safety official Elson Zuluaga. While the house on the estate was badly damaged, Botero’s studio escaped unscathed. [AFP]

    – Art Meets Economics at Davos: During this week’s World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, two giants of the art world — Iranian artist and filmmaker Shirin Neshat and Metropolitan Museum director Thomas P. Campbell — were on hand to offer the economists and politicians in attendance wildly divergent advice. Neshat, who received the Forum’s Crystal Award, advised Iran’s new president, Hassan Rouhani: “Take care of your artists, your intellectuals. And accept that art is no crime, that it is every artist’s responsibility to make art that is meaningful, that questions tyranny, that question injustice.” Campbell sounded a divergent note: “Discussion of the culture industry needs to be involved at a deeper socioeconomic level. We need to make our case with metrics, framed in a language that businessmen understand.” [TANNYT]

    – Esmerian Collection Sets Record: The collection of Ralph O. Esmerian — the currently jailed, former chairman of the American Folk Art Museum — has sold at Sotheby’s for $13 million. Of that, $10.5 million will go to pay down Esmerian’s $140 million debt that was accrued after the jeweler was convicted of fraud in 2011. According to Sotheby’s, the sale brought the highest amount ever for an American folk art collection. [BloombergTAN]

    – Accused Johns Forger Pleads Guilty: Foundry owner Brian Ramnarine, who’s accused of forging and trying to sell a Jasper Johns work, has pled guilty to three counts of wire fraud. [NYT]

    – Tacoma Museum Donates Robes: The Tacoma Art Museum is donating nine Chinese robes, which the institution controversially tried to deaccession last year, to the Chinese Reconciliation Project Foundation. [Tacoma News Tribune]

    – New Mexico Proposes Auction Oversight: A bill proposed last week in the New Mexico state legislature would impose government oversight on auction houses. [New Mexican]

    – In an episode of Tate and Le Méridien’s YouTube series Unlock Art, artist and “Girls” star Jemima Kirke offers a feminist take on art history while donning a Guerrilla Girls mask. [Telegraph]

     

    Description: Frame– A 19th-century watercolor painting by Victorian artist Richard Dadd turned up in an 1885 scrapbook that a keen buyer acquired for £200 ($330) on eBay. [TAN]

    – On March 29 the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles will host a gala celebrating its 35th anniversary, the L.A. opening of Mike Kelley’s retrospective, and the institution’s new director, Philippe Vergne. [Press release]

    ALSO ON ARTINFO

    Small Delights at “Postcards from the Edge”

    Musée des Arts to Exhibit Vernis Martin Lacquer Works

    Highlights From Maison & Objet, the Design Capital of France

    The Gwangju Biennale is Burning Down the House

    At NEA Celebration, Divergent (and Rambling) Thoughts About Jazz Mastery

    Check our blog IN THE AIR for breaking news throughout the day.

    Fernando Botero

    0 0
  • 01/28/14--09:20: London
  • Undefined
    Display: 
    Don't display
    Use alternative description in place of "Hours" (Edit text below): 
    Directions: 
    Address: 
    Neighborhood: 
    Location Phone: 
    +44 20 7300 5610
    Admissions: 
    Combined Tickets:; Adults: 12; Seniors & Disabled: 10; Corporate Members & Students: 8; Concessions & 12-18 years: 3; Children (8-11): 2; Children under 7: Free
    Collections: 
    British art 18th Century to the Present
    Has Cafe: 
    Has Store: 
    Has Film: 
    Is Free Listing: 
    Opening Hours Alternative Text: 
    Saturday to Thursday 10AM to 6PM<br />Friday 10AM to 10PM
    location fax: 
    Guide Landing page: 
    Region on the Guide Landing page: 
    None

    0 0

    Remembering the Life of Folk Singer and Activist Pete Seeger

    Pete Seeger, the singer who spurned commercialism while spearheading the folk music revival, died Monday from natural causes. He was 94. In 2009, he performed at the inaugural concert for President Obama, where he sang “We Shall Overcome,” the civil-rights balled he made famous.

    It would be disingenuous to simply call Seeger a singer. He was as much orator as songsmith, and his concerts, especially after he was blacklisted in the early 1950s, took the form of homespun vigils. He was the preacher and his sermons intertwined with the melodies as his audience watched in raptured awe. The songs, many of them from the songbook Seeger helped canonize, would begin and end with stories — about the history of the songs, what they mean, how they resonate with people who are listening. Take in a live recording — “The Complete Bowdoin College Concert, 1960” is a good place to start — and it feels like a conversation, between artist and audience, between the singer and you.

    People listened to Seeger because he spoke from experience. Beginning with the Almanac Singers, later with the Weavers, and finally as a solo act, he had lived many lives. He attended Harvard, joined the Young Communist League, and hopped trains with Woody Guthrie, picking up the oral tradition of folk songs along the way. He was all but barred from television and radio for a large chunk of his career due to his refusal to cooperate with the House Un-American Activities Committee, who indicted him on 10 counts of contempt of Congress in 1957. Seeger was sentenced to a year in prison, which was dismissed in appeals court the following year.

    As his public image was tarnished, his reputation grew. More people came to see him perform. His concerts were an act of protest, his defiant stance against institutions of power — the music industry, the war industry — heroic in their opposition. Sometimes, this stance was too rigid (Seeger famously resisted Bob Dylan’s electric turn at the Newport Jazz Festival), and his politics never addressed his coming from a place of privilege. But his rebellion, as an image, is something to admire and remember.

    Pete Seeger performing in 1986.

    0 0

    English
    Order: 
    0
    Author(s): 

    0 0

    Locks Gallery, Philadelphia
    Open December 6, 2013 through January 30, 2014

    For his third show at the gallery in five years, Wynne constructs a metaphorical landscape with poetic objects that reference the natural elements of earth, air, water, and fire. Featuring wall sculptures made from hand-poured glass, canvases of appropriated imagery and embroidered text, and found rocks covered in diamond dust, Wynne’s exhibition takes viewers into a dreamlike realm, where art-historical, literary, and spiritual forces collide.

    The Lure of Unknown Regions Beyond the Rim of Experience, 2013, displays funky glass letters that whimsically tumble down the wall, spelling out an entrancing phrase from a book about a failed expedition to K2, the world’s second-highest mountain. Wave, 2013, consisting of 1,700 pieces of poured mirrored glass, playfully riffs on the famous woodblock prints of Japanese artist Hokusai. Abstractly representing water, it is the artist’s largest work to date.
 A third wall contains seven different works, clusters of hundreds of unique glass butterflies with thoughtful titles like 52 Forms of Being, 2013. The silvery butterflies symbolize air in Wynne’s visual vocabulary.

    Two easel-size canvases with digitally printed paintings of castles add to the narrative of an imaginary place. Sparkling with glitter, their titles—Away, 2004, and In the Air, 2009—are embroidered on the surface. A third canvas, Flame, 2013, appropriates fire from a painting by the French Baroque classicist Jean Restout and is embellished with diamond dust and a shimmering fabric bow. Treating the gallery like the wilderness, the artist strews dozens of rocks that are painted black and sprinkled with diamond dust across the floor. The installation of reflective stones anchors the complex canvas and glass works while marking a connection to a mystical environment—one that reads like a sublime projection from Wynne’s mind. —Paul Laster

    Last Chance: Rob Wynne at Locks Gallery in Philadelphia
    Rob Wynne's "Wave," 2013.

older | 1 | .... | 245 | 246 | (Page 247) | 248 | 249 | .... | 332 | newer